DROMEDARY CAMEL (The Plaza at CityCenter) Hung Yi’s Bactrian and Dromedary camels, aka two and one humped camels, represent travel, survival, and journeying. Bactrian, the two humped camel, is named after the area once known as Bactria, or Central Asia, from where they originated. Dromedary camels have one hump, and are native to African and Middle Eastern Deserts. Not only did Hung Yi take two already unusual, almost mythical animals and make them even more wild and whimsical, he also is encouraging unity between the diverse cultures these two camels represent.

BACTRIAN CAMEL (The Plaza at CtiyCenter) Hung Yi’s Bactrian and Dromedary camels, aka two and one humped camels, represent travel, survival, and journeying. Bactrian, the two humped camel, is named after the area once known as Bactria, or Central Asia, from where they originated. Dromedary camels have one hump, and are native to African and Middle Eastern Deserts. Not only did Hung Yi take two already unusual, almost mythical animals and make them even more wild and whimsical, he also is encouraging unity between the diverse cultures these two camels represent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DRAGON HORSE (Chinatown Park) is inspired by the Taiwanese term, 龍馬精神, meaning to have boundless energy. “Dragon” is often used as a term of endearment for highly energetic people in Taiwanese culture, and some even think of themselves as descendants of the dragon. Hung Yi uses his fantastic imagination here, creating a horse with a dragon’s horn. An emissary sits on the Dragon Horse, and is traveling over the world on its back. The rich color, peony pattern, and the dragon’s scales make this piece truly unique. All of the painted elements are symbols of auspiciousness, wealth, and power. In addition, the patterns resemble Taiwanese Hakka fabric, often found on tablecloths, napkins, and much more.

AUSPICIOUS TRIPLE SHEEP (Herald Square) The Taiwanese commonly regard sheep as an auspicious animal, and the Year of the Sheep heralds a year of promise and prosperity. The sheep counts kindness, and benevolence among its meanings as well. The number three is also very lucky, and it is believed that groups of three are even luckier. Therefore, Auspicious Triple Sheep, represents great luck with its group of three, towering sheep. The patterns and colors painted on Auspicious Triple Sheep are a combination of Taiwanese folk-customs and traditional Japanese aesthetics of cotton print. Hung Yi creates a unique style by mixing two different cultures on this soaring sculpture.

AMERICAN EAGLE AND BUFFALO (The Park at CityCenter) The brave eagle and the peaceful pigeon stand on the back of Taiwanese water buffalo. The eagle, represented on one side of the depiction, is spreading its wings, symbolizing the American Dream; the pigeon, represented on the opposite side, encouraging peaceful coexistence between all races; the water buffalo representing the artist’s efforts and hard work that led him to show his work on an international stage. In his sculpture, Hung Yi is bringing two animals that wouldn’t normally live in harmony together. He created this piece specifically for his first American exhibition in San Francisco, using two iconic American animals, yet applying his own artistic Taiwanese spin.

 

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